Ben Rose
Station Wagon Interior, Utopia Parkway, Queens, 1955
Vintage silver gelatin, printed 1955
48 x 9 inches

Ben Rose 
Wall, Corinne, Shadow, ca. 1950
Vintage silver gelatin, printed ca. 1950
48 x 9 inches

Ben Rose 
Studio Experiment with Corinne Conner, ca. 1950
Vintage silver gelatin, printed ca. 1950
48 x 9 inches

Ben Rose 
Roller Coaster, Palisades Park, ca. 1950
Vintage silver gelatin, printed ca. 1950
46 x 9 inches

Ben Rose 
Central Park Wisteria Arbor with Corinne Connor, ca. 1950
Vintage silver gelatin, printed ca. 1950
48 x 9 inches

Ben Rose 
Brooklyn Bridge, ca. 1953
Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1953
9 x 48 inches

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Exhibition: January 10 - February 2, 2008

OPening Reception: Thursday January 10, 6-8pm

Steven Kasher Gallery is proud to present the panoramic photographs of Ben Rose (1916- 1980). The exhibition will feature 15 large-scale vintage contact prints from the 1950s, each approximately 9 x 48”. These dynamic prints are the fulcrum of Ben Rose’s experimentation with photographic technology and photographic seeing. Works from this series have been purchased recently by the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Rose studied under the legendary Alexey Brodovitch at what was then the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Design. In the 1950’s Rose moved his studio to New York where he achieved worldwide fame for his editorial and advertising photography, including work for Harper’s Bazaar. He began to experiment with Cirkut cameras, redesigning the motors and using the modified apparatus to make a suite of 360° panoramic studies of the New York metropolitan landscape. The result is a body of work representing the passage of time itself, the capabilities of the photographic eye, and the changing New York cityscape.

Rose was called “a pioneer of American photography” by the renowned portrait photographer Arnold Newman. Upon his death in 1980, the New York Times hailed Rose as “one of the most remarkable combinations of photographic talent to float through the 20th century,” for “the extraordinary fearlessness with which he approached solutions for seemingly unsolvable problems”, and for the “sophisticated cinematics he confines within each still photograph.”

Rose is a descendant of the tradition of Eadweard Muybridge, Thomas Eakins, Harold Edgerton, and Gjon Mili. His interest in motion and special lighting effects led him to invent new ways of linking photographic, electronic, and early computer technologies.

Prints in this exhibition include the Brooklyn Bridge, the interior of Ben Rose’s studio, Bethesda Fountain in Central Park, the interior of Rose’s station wagon parked in Utopia Parkway, Times Square, the United Nations Building, and the Coney Island roller coaster.

For further information or reproduction scans, please contact Maria Stenina:maria@stevenkasher.com 212 966 3978.