Pete Souza's 'Shade' in The New York Times

Pete Souza's 'Shade' in The New York Times

May 23, 2018

Pete Souza's upcoming book  'Shade: A Tale of Two Presidents' is featured in The New York Times. Intended to be a "portrait in contrasts,"  the publication displays Souza's photographs of 44th President Barack Obama juxtposed with tweets, headlines, quotes, and other material from the first 500 days of the Trump Administration. Pete Souza: Throw Shade, Then Vote opens Thursday, October 11. 

 

Washington Post on Pete Souza's 'Shade

Washington Post on Pete Souza's 'Shade

May 23, 2018

The Washington Post excitedly announces Pete Souza's upcoming publication 'SHADE: A Tale of Two Presidents." Souza, the White House photographer in the Obama administration, has developed a 2-million-strong following on social media due in part to his expert trolling of President Trump - by pairing photographs with commentary, tweets, and screenshots. The work will be on view in an exhibition titled Throw Shade, Then Vote, opening at Steven Kasher Gallery in October. 

The New York Times on Fred W. McDarrah: New York Scenes

The New York Times on Fred W. McDarrah: New York Scenes

September 6, 2018

NYT Critic Dwight Garner gives a glowing review to “Fred W. McDarrah: New York Scenes,” a new publication accompanying McDarrah’s upcoming exhibition. “It’s a book like few others. McDarrah had an inflamed curiosity, great feelers and an ability to capture liquid moments. He was in the right place at the right time, for sure, and caught a subculture in situ. He also had hustle.”

 

Fred W. McDarrah and the Village Voice in the New York Times

Fred W. McDarrah and the Village Voice in the New York Times

September 21, 2018

Fred W. McDarrah's photographs are featured in The New York Times in a piece titled "Seven Ways the Village Voice Made New York A Better Place." Reporter John Leland discusses the newspaper's efforts to create social change in New York, including vanquishing Tammany Hall, exposing corrupt politicians and landlords, giving a platform to feminists, and covering racial violence.

The New York Times says goodbye to the Village Voice

The New York Times says goodbye to the Village Voice

September 5, 2018

After shuttering its doors last week, The Village Voice is featured in the New York Times. "[It] isn’t just about the end of a newspaper. To some of us at least, it’s about the end of New York as a cultural and political center, as the place that the world turned to for art, for music, for leadership in new and uncomfortable ideas, often perceived by the mainstream to be dangerous or weird. Fred McDarrah liked to affectionately call it “the commie, hippie, pinko rag.”

Daily Mail on Fred W. McDarrah: New York Scenes

Daily Mail on Fred W. McDarrah: New York Scenes

September 20, 2018

Fred W. McDarrah: New York Scenes is featured in Daily Mail online. The piece, titled "Beatniks, bohemians and Bob Dylan" discusses McDarrah's "fun-loving, yet candid" images of New York that span the 1950s to 1970s. "McDarrah's photos were the graphic expression of the Village Voice. He covered Gotham's diverse downtown scenes where he frequented galleries, cafes, bars and bookstores where artists and musicians often gathered." 

GQ Italia on Fred W. McDarrah

GQ Italia on Fred W. McDarrah

September 20, 2018

Fred W. McDarrah: New York Scenes is featured in GQ Italia. The feature includes selections from the exhibition and hones in on McDarrah's influence on New York's arts and culture scene. "The fact remains that since the mid-fifties, in the city in which he had taken the first steps, McDarrah has told every artistic, political and cultural ferment. Become a photographer of the Village Voice, has immortalized, among others, the beginnings of Bob Dylan, Jack Kerouac, Andy Warhol and Allen Ginsberg."

 

Artnews interviews Ming Smith

Artnews interviews Ming Smith

September 20, 2018

In an interview with Artnews, Ming Smith discusses "Soul of a Nation" at the Brooklyn Museum, her career, and her experiences photographing Harlem. "When I came to Harlem, what was missing for me a lot was the love in photographs of us—the dignity of the race, things like that. I didn’t see that in images. Sometimes, now, I still don’t see it, but the landscape has completely changed. But back then, many times I would just see people impoverished. I wanted to show the grace, the love, and—how do you say?–the surviving. You know, still surviving. Dignity."