Charles Moore - Selma March

Charles Moore
Martin Luther King Jr. Addressing a Meeting of the Montgomery Improvement Association, Which was Founded in 1955 to Organize the Bus Boycott. A year Later, the Bus System was Integrated.  1958
Gelatin silver, printed later
14 x 11 inches
Signed by photographer verso

 

Spider Martin ​- Selma March

Spider Martin
Bob Mants, John Lewis, Hosea Williams and Andrew Young with Brown’s Chapel AME Church in the background, March 7th, 1965
Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1965
13.5 x 10.5 inches
Signed by photographer recto; photographer’s stamp verso

James barker - Selma March

James H. Barker
Saturday, March 21. Afternoon. “SNCC office signs and notes. When the exhibit was shown at the Rosa Parks Museum in Montgomery in 2010, it was pointed out that the note at the top left about a 63 Olds with Michigan plates, was owned by Viola Liuzzo who was killed by members of the KKK the night after the march concluded. The note in the middle probably to Andy Rooney.” 1965
Unique vintage gelatin silver print mounted on board, printed 1965
13 ¾ x 9 ¼ inches
Photographer stamp verso, numbered “6” verso

James barker - Selma March

James H. Barker
Saturday, March 21. Afternoon. “Being driven around Selma. We were asked at times to sit low so as not call attention to cars transporting visiting demonstrators.” 1965
Unique vintage gelatin silver print mounted on board, printed 1965
9 x 13 ¾ inches
Photographer stamp verso, numbered “2” verso

James barker - Selma March

James H. Barker
Saturday, March 21. Afternoon. In the basement of Brown Chapel. 1965
Unique vintage gelatin silver print mounted on board, printed 1965
15 x 19 inches
Photographer stamp verso, numbered “14” verso

Spider Martin ​- Selma March

Spider Martin
The third march makes its way through Lowndes Country under armed guard. "Marching up Highway 80 under the protection of the US army. Sharpshooters were stationed in those houses on the horizon and some were behind me. It was wet on this day but the singing of We Shall Overcome kept up everyone's spirits." March 21st, 1965
Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1965
9.75 x 13.75 inches
Signed by photographer recto; photographer’s stamp verso

Charles Moore - Selma March

Charles Moore
Sherriff's Deputies Prepare to Confront Marchers, Selma, Alabama, March 7, 1965
Gelatin silver, printed ca. 1990
8 x 10 inches
Charles Moore stamp and annotations verso

 

Spider Martin ​- Selma March

Spider Martin
Hosea Williams and John Lewis confront Troopers on Bloody Sunday. "There had been a two minute warning, but like the old song went, ‘there ain't no turning me 'round.’ The troopers stampeded into the crowd beating everything in sight that was black. The marchers stood their ground, but were beaten down like dominoes." March 7th, 1965
Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1965
8.5 x 13.5 inches
Signed by photographer recto; photographer’s stamp verso

Charles Moore - Selma March

Charles Moore
Almost Immediately After Telling Marchers They had “Two Minutes to Disperse” the State Troopers Charge with Their Billy Clubs, Selma, Alabama, 1965
Gelatin silver, printed ca. 2000
16 x 20 inches

 

Charles Moore - Selma March

Charles Moore
State Police Wearing Gas Masks Fire Teargas at the Marchers and Then Charge Them a Second Time, 1965
Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1965
9 1/4 x 13 1/2 inches
Signed by photographer and Black Star stamp verso

 

Spider Martin ​- Selma March

Spider Martin
A marcher protests segregation across the United States, the flag positioned upside-down to signal distress. "No, that's not disrespect, it means our nation is in distress. It was hard getting shots like these. I didn't have a motor-drive camera. I didn't have auto-focus. And when I cranked the lever for the next exposure it would always move the camera a little. No automatic exposure either. It was very difficult just to shoot the pix and on top of that I was marching backwards not knowing if some redneck was about to beat me up. I was attacked on 7 different occasions." March 21st, 1965
Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1965
13.5 x 6.5 inches
Signed by photographer recto; photographer’s stamp verso

James barker - Selma March

James H. Barker
Wednesday, March 25. “Walking through the streets of Montgomery.” 1965
Unique vintage gelatin silver print mounted on board, printed 1965
10 ½ x 13 5/8 inches
Photographer stamp verso, numbered “68” verso

Spider Martin ​- Selma March

Spider Martin
Dr. King leads the march along with James Forman of SNCC and Reverend Jessie Douglas around the State Capitol in Montgomery. March 25th, 1965
Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1965
9 x 13.7 inches
Signed by photographer recto; photographer’s stamp verso

James barker - Selma March

James H. Barker
Tuesday, March 24. “Marching on the streets of Montgomery after the rain had ceased.” 1965
Unique vintage gelatin silver print mounted on board, printed 1965
20 x 16 inches
Photographer stamp verso, numbered “61” verso

Charles Moore - Selma March

Charles Moore
Many Celebrities Joined the March to Montgomery and Entertained the Marchers on Wednesday Evening. Joan Baez and Harry Belafonte, 1965
Gelatin silver, printed ca. 1990
8 x 10 inches

Spider Martin ​- Selma March

Spider Martin
Dr. King speaking on the steps of the State Capitol. "Dr. King delivering his speech where Jefferson Davis was sworn in as President of the Confederate States. Montgomery, the cradle of the Confederacy, the birthplace of Civil Rights." March 25th, 1965
Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1965
9.25 x 13.5 inches
Signed by photographer recto; photographer’s stamp verso

PRESS RELEASE

Download PDF

Selma March 1965

Exhibition: March 5th – April 18th 2015

Opening Reception: Thursday, March 5th, 6 – 8 PM.

To be attended by James Barker, Tracy Martin and Michelle Moore Peel

 

Steven Kasher Gallery is proud to present the exhibition Selma March 1965.  This is the largest and most comprehensive exhibition of photographs ever mounted about the historic 1965 marches for civil rights, featuring over 150 vintage photographs. The photographers are James Barker, Spider Martin and Charles Moore, each represented by a set of photographs never before presented in New York or in a gallery anywhere. These three bodies of work capture three diverse perspectives. Moore was working for Life magazine, the leading national weekly of its time; Martin was working for the segregationistBirmingham News; Barker was sent as a participant observer by Washington State University in response to Martin Luther King’s summons to people of conscience. Together they present a complicated, sometimes monumental, sometimes intimate historical moment. 
 

This exhibition commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Selma marches and the Voting Rights Act they catalyzed, and is the 30th public exhibition that Steven Kasher has organized of photography of the Civil Rights Movement. The photographs on display are an inspiring and chilling reminder that those who fight for social justice do so creatively and at great risk, with no guarantee that their efforts will be successful -- though sometimes they are, if only partially.

 

On March 7th, 1965, Alabama state troopers and a local posse viciously attacked civil rights demonstrators in Selma, Alabama, stopping their march and wounding many. The marchers had organized to trek across Lowndes County to the state capital, as part of a long-building protest against the denial of voting rights to Southern blacks. A few days later, a second march, led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., turned back rather than risk confrontation. A third, ultimately successful march left Selma on March 21, and arrived in Montgomery five days later.  By then, President Lyndon B. Johnson, pushed by Dr. King and by the horrific images of official brutality captured by still and film photographers, had introduced the Voting Rights Act to Congress, which became law later in that year. Three of the photographers on the scene were James Barker, James ‘Spider’ Martin, and Charles Moore. 
 

Charles Moore’s pictures are the best known. They were published in two issues of Life,then the most read and shared journal in the U. S., with a wider audience than the television news. His pictures of peaceful demonstrators and brutal police shocked the nation and galvanized Congressional response. Moore’s Civil Rights Movement pictures have been published and exhibited widely ever since, especially the ones he took of the Birmingham protests in 1963. Those pictures, of protestors fire-hosed and attacked by police dogs, are the most iconic images of the Civil Rights Movement. They earned Moore renown, but also arrest in Birmingham, and a year’s banishment from Alabama, his native state. His earliest pictures in this exhibition document the rise to prominence in Montgomery of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., taken while Moore was chief photographer for The Montgomery Advertiser. Moore’s Selma pictures for Life record the brutal attack on the first march, then attacks on civil rights activists in Montgomery, and finally the joyous culmination in Montgomery of the third march.

 

In 1965 Spider Martin was a young staff photographer at The Birmingham News. Spider was sent to cover the Selma events, but the News was reluctant to feature his images. Once the Bloody Sunday violence preempted national television programing and exposed what was happening in Selma, the News had no choice but to prominently publish Spider's pictures, moving them from the back of the paper to the front. The News released Spider from his assignment after Bloody Sunday because "the largely segregationist editors thought if you didn't publish it, much of this would go away." But Spider won out his argument with his editors to stay on, so he covered the Selma activities through Turnaround Tuesday and the third successful march. His photographs traveled all over the world, appearing in such publications as Time, Life, Der Spiegel, Stern, The Saturday Evening Post, Paris Match, and numerous books.  Martin’s pictures are among the most dramatic and monumental of the events. His prints have never been exhibited in New York previously. Most of his archive now resides in the Briscoe Center at the University of Texas, Austin. 
 

James Barker was a participant observer on the third Selma march. As a staff photographer working at Washington State University he was chosen to join a delegation of three sent by the university to support and witness the march. His images are the only insider ones known to exist -- as opposed to photojournalistic. He captures the fear, weariness, tedium, and organizational details of the third march in a most intimate way. Barker continues to practice as a documentary photographer in his adopted state, Alaska.

 

Steven Kasher Gallery has relocated to 515 West 26th Street, New York, NY 10001. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM. www.stevenkasher.com. For more information about the gallery and all other inquiries, please contact: Maya Piergies, 212-966-3978 or maya@stevenkasher.com.